In this second article in the series we look at the most common utes (and a few others) and how they stack up in real weight terms.

Our comparison chart shows that there are some considerable (but varied)  discrepancies between what the vehicle ratings are and what you can actually tow and/or carry.

In the Utes, if you want to load the vehicle to its fullest then the only ones that can pull that 3500Kg is the Landcruiser 70 Series, and the Nissan Navara which can still tow 3500Kg when fully loaded. Having said that “fully loaded” for the Navara is still a respectable 560Kg (564M/558A) but with a limited 300Kg towball loading.  Bear in mind though that this 560Kg (as with all) includes the weight of everything not factory standard which includes bull bar and lights, towbar, roof racks, internal drawers, fridge slide, fridge, canopy and all the other “stuff” that we all cart around, especially those of us who live on the road full time.  Don’t forget the weight of yourself/selves plus the dog!  (And the tinny or Kayak(s) on the top). 

This is the only way the Utes make up for the difference with the Wagons which have payloads often about half that of the Ute.

The following summarised chart shows all the common models; in each case we have picked a mid to top end model which seem to be the most popular.

As well as the most common models we have also added the Mercedes (Nissan based);, the Iveco 4WD, which competes on price with the Landcruiser 70 Dual Cab; and the new LDV Dual Cab which has some impressive specs. for its price, apart from being a little under powered.

HiLux SR

HiLux SR

Some Figures to help in Calculating Your Load:
The best approach is of course to weigh everything but we provide a guide here to what many commonly added items may weigh.

Driver and passenger (M and F) – Minimum 110Kg (65+45)
Bull Bar – Aluminium – usually adds 45-50Kg
Bull Bar –Steel – usually adds 75-90Kg
Towbar, tongue and shank (Hayman Reese) – Adds ~35Kg
Roof Bars (Set of 3) – Adds 20Kg minimum
Roof Rack – full length, steel – Adds 50Kg
Dual Drawers with fridge slide – Adds 100Kg, less any removed seats in a wagon.
Fridge, 60L, reasonably full – Adds 50-60Kg
Ute Canopy – Add 60Kg minimum

Loading and Towing – 4WD Vehicles  – Dual Cab Utes >=3000Kg Towing Capacity 2018

Manufacturer

Model

P/D/TD

Trans.

Kerb

GVM

Payload

Max ball weight

Payload less ball weight

GCM

Max Trailer Weight (ATM)

Max Trailer ATM at GVM

Payload at Max allowed Trailer

Dual Cab Utilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ford

Ranger Wildtrak

Turbo Diesel

M6/A6

2250

3200

950

350

600

6000

3500

3150

250

Ford

Ranger XLT

Turbo Diesel

M6/A7

2053

3200

1143

350

793

6000

3500

3150

443

Holden

Colorado LTZ

Diesel

M6/A6

2128/2121

3150

1022/1029

350

672/679

6000

3500

3200

272/279

Isuzu

D-Max LS-T

Turbo Diesel

A6

2026

3050

1024

350

674

5950

3500

3300

424

Mazda

BT50 XTR

Diesel

A6

2220

3200

980

350

630

6000

3500

3150

280

Mercedes

X-250d Progressive

Twin Turbo Diesel

M6/A7

2130/2137

3250

1120/1113

350

770/763

6130

3500

3230

500/493

Mitsubishi

TritonExceed

Diesel

A5

1950

2900

950

310

640

5885

3100

3100

640

Nissan

Navara ST/SR

Twin Turbo Diesel

M6/A7

1936/1942

2910

974/968

0**

974/968

5910

3500

^^

^^

Nissan

Navara ST/SR

Twin Turbo Diesel

M6/A7

1936/1942

2800**

864/858

300**

564/558

5910

3500

3500

564/558

Toyota

HiLux SR

Turbo Diesel

M6

2040

3000

960

350

610

5850

3500

3200

310

Toyota

HiLux SR5

Turbo Diesel

A6

2045

3000

955

350

605

5650

3200

3000

405

Toyota

70 Series GXL

Turbo Diesel

M5

2175

3300

1125

350

775

6800

3500

3500

775

Volkswagen

Amarok V6 Sportline

Turbo Diesel

A8

2171

3080

909

300

609

6000

3500

3220

329

LDV

T60 Pro

Turbo Diesel

M6/A6

1950/1980

3050

1025/995

300

725/695

6050

3000

3000

725/965

Iveco

Daily 4×4 Dual Cab

Turbo Diesel

M6*

2990

4495

1505

350

1095

7995

3500

3500

1505

Iveco *2 Wheel Drive Model has A8 option.

Navara **300Kg allowed at reduced payload, ^^Not practical with 0Kg

**Nissan specify that for a towball loading of 300Kg the total Payload be reduced by 410Kg,(not just the 300Kg of the ball weight) similarly for a towball loading of 200Kg the payload has to be reduced by 280Kg.  We have made a theoretical change to GVM to more easily show the figures for 300Kg towball weight. Obviously towing at 0Kg ball weight is impractical, and in fact dangerous, so we have left the figures blank for that.

In some cases you can’t pull the full 3500Kg in any circumstances with nothing in the vehicle! (Assuming 350Kg towball  loading).  Let us look at the Ford Ranger as an example of this:

The GCM of the Ranger is 6000Kg so with the fully loaded van at 3500Kg that leaves a gross weight of 2500Kg for the Ranger after towball weight (which is already included when you weigh the whole rig together).  As the Ranger Wildtrak has a Kerb weight of 2250Kg there is only 250Kg to cover the extras like bullbar, towbar, fridge, tools etc.; plus Driver and Passenger!  Therefore the safe limit is somewhere between the 3150Kg in our chart and a little higher if the Ranger is not fully loaded.  Interesting to note here is that if you “downgrade” to the bare bones XLT 3.2L Model  the Kerb weight is so much lower you gain 193Kg in payload; these are the “weight costs” of a more luxury model.  No doubt this may apply to other manufacturers as well but we have not explored all the options.

All baseline figures used in the above charts are from Manufacturers published specifications at May 2018.

Our calculations above allow only for the maximum towball weight as shown, some 3500Kg ATM vans have towball weights around 280Kg which will give the tow vehicle another 70Kg; you can easily do your own calculations for a particular van.

With so many great looking utes out there in the market place, it is important to not get carried away on looks and price and make sure that you select the right one that is going to do the job for you.   The example given above is only one case, and in each and every case you should take into consideration your own van and weights.  The article and table above are only and indication and a guide to assist you with this.

Articles written also for FreeRangeCamping and published by them

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